2.27.2010

And Another...

video

4 comments:

pure_sophist_monster said...

VIOLENCE!

pure_sophist_monster said...

Also, I haven't poured anything into anybody in weeks. The short answer, for me at least, is this:

http://www9.georgetown.edu/faculty/nar26/organizational_rhetoric_and_writing.htm

It's a class I have on tap for the fall. No assignments. I simply give the groups problems - tailored to their organizational goals and mission - that they then have to solve through rhetorical acts. I then facilitate the creation of whatever texts they think are necessary to respond with. For me, the moment of rhetorical "enlightenment" (leaving aside the irony of that statement) comes when students see how their discursive practices are both a response to and a cultivation of ongoing rhetorical situations and structures.

Casey said...

Pffff... "rhetorical enlightenment." I can see us now, in ten years, co-authoring papers. [I couldn't read that assignment-link because it dragged off the edge of my page. Put it in as a hot-link?]

I can't remember if I said anything about this or not, but Amos Bronson Alcott was the biggest exponent of this kind of draw-it-out education. At first it attracted some wealthy pupils, including (I think) Hawthorne himself (!), but eventually the enterprise folded because it didn't seem to be "getting anywhere." Here's an excerpt:



Alcott: What is praying sincerely?

Lemuel: Praying the truth.

Alcott: What is to be done in praying the truth? When you think of prayer, do you think of a position of the body—of words?

Lemuel: (earnestly) I think of something else, but I cannot express it.

Josiah: (burst out) To pray, Mr. Alcott, is to be good, really . . . and to be good to God alone, because then we are good for goodness’ sake, and not to be seen, and not for people’s sake. Well, so it is with prayer. There must be nothing outward about prayer; but we must have some words, sometimes; sometimes we need not. If we don’t feel the prayer, it is worse than never to say a word of prayer. It is wrong not to pray, but it is more wrong to speak prayer and not pray. We had better do nothing about it, Mr. Alcott! We must say words in a prayer, and we must feel the words we say, and we must do what belongs to the words.

Alcott: Oh! There must be doing, must there?

Josiah: Oh! yes, Mr. Alcott! Doing is the most important part.

Casey said...

Pffff... "rhetorical enlightenment." I can see us now, in ten years, co-authoring papers. [I couldn't read that assignment-link because it dragged off the edge of my page. Put it in as a hot-link?]

I can't remember if I said anything about this or not, but Amos Bronson Alcott was the biggest exponent of this kind of draw-it-out education. At first it attracted some wealthy pupils, including (I think) Hawthorne himself (!), but eventually the enterprise folded because it didn't seem to be "getting anywhere." Here's an excerpt:



Alcott: What is praying sincerely?

Lemuel: Praying the truth.

Alcott: What is to be done in praying the truth? When you think of prayer, do you think of a position of the body—of words?

Lemuel: (earnestly) I think of something else, but I cannot express it.

Josiah: (burst out) To pray, Mr. Alcott, is to be good, really . . . and to be good to God alone, because then we are good for goodness’ sake, and not to be seen, and not for people’s sake. Well, so it is with prayer. There must be nothing outward about prayer; but we must have some words, sometimes; sometimes we need not. If we don’t feel the prayer, it is worse than never to say a word of prayer. It is wrong not to pray, but it is more wrong to speak prayer and not pray. We had better do nothing about it, Mr. Alcott! We must say words in a prayer, and we must feel the words we say, and we must do what belongs to the words.

Alcott: Oh! There must be doing, must there?

Josiah: Oh! yes, Mr. Alcott! Doing is the most important part.